Home | Television | Movies | Music | Other Media | Community | Sports | Arcade | Tech | Help
  MyMedia-Forum.com > Community > Lostaways! :) > Politics

Lostaways! :) Welcome Lostaways! Kick back, relax, and have a little fun!

Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-17-17, 01:46 PM   #371
azteclady
Reads. Crafts. Rabble Rouses. Rants.
Hears the Whispers
 
azteclady's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Looking for trouble and raising hell.
Posts: 14,563
Re: Politics

Regarding that police state thing: we have more cops, armed with ever more deadly weapons, but the money spent training them--and the quality of that training--doesn't increase.

When Black/brown people are shot and killed and Black/brown people point out that police brutality against them is rampant, and that cops (particularly white cops) are never held responsible for murdering people of color, one of the usual, loud, responses, is "wait until YOU need a cop."

To which, people of color usually say something along the lines of, "we don't call cops because they will shoot US" (link--or just do a search for "Seattle woman shot by cops after calling for help").

When this is pointed out, most of those same people find explanations--well, she probably 'looked shady' or some similar bullshit.

I wonder who they will explain away cops shooting a white woman, through her car door, after she called to report a possible assault near her home. (Hey, look, a FOX NEWS link!)

I also wonder how many white people will try to help fellow citizens being attacked, now that they KNOW that they, too, can be shot by poorly trained cops.
__________________
Support MyMedia, shop through our aStore
Also found at my blog and twitter (adult language, adult topics, not always safe for work)

Ignoring annoying blowhards everywhere, for a good long time
azteclady is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 02:55 PM   #372
azteclady
Reads. Crafts. Rabble Rouses. Rants.
Hears the Whispers
 
azteclady's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Looking for trouble and raising hell.
Posts: 14,563
Re: Politics

Making voting more difficult, if not near impossible, IS voter suppression.

If you are elderly and/or infirm, and cannot walk a mile, let alone ten, then you are SOL, and that's fine? Interesting perspective.

Also interesting: nearly 15,000 hacking attempts to SC's voting system on Nov 8, 2016. The hackers ended up with access to some 90,000 voters records. To make it impossible for any of those 90K citizens to vote, particularly those registered as democrats or independents, all the hackers had to do was alter any ONE data point. Add or change a middle initial, change a day or month or year of birth. Change a street address. ONE little change, and that person could not vote; regardless of how important or trivial voting was to them, they were not allowed to vote by the officials in charge of their polling place.
__________________
Support MyMedia, shop through our aStore
Also found at my blog and twitter (adult language, adult topics, not always safe for work)

Ignoring annoying blowhards everywhere, for a good long time
azteclady is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 03:37 PM   #373
Rocky Raccoon
In Between 'Verses
Hears the Whispers
 
Rocky Raccoon's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: In between verses
Posts: 13,153
Re: Politics

Just gonna leave this here:

https://i.imgur.com/mAzCsdv.jpg

This is why DT secured so much more of the Latino vote than the
paid pundits thought he would.

I'll join in on the actual discussion later.
Rocky Raccoon is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 03:38 PM   #374
Rocky Raccoon
In Between 'Verses
Hears the Whispers
 
Rocky Raccoon's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: In between verses
Posts: 13,153
Re: Politics

Quote:
Originally Posted by azteclady View Post
Regarding that police state thing: we have more cops, armed with ever more deadly weapons, but the money spent training them--and the quality of that training--doesn't increase.

When Black/brown people are shot and killed and Black/brown people point out that police brutality against them is rampant, and that cops (particularly white cops) are never held responsible for murdering people of color, one of the usual, loud, responses, is "wait until YOU need a cop."

To which, people of color usually say something along the lines of, "we don't call cops because they will shoot US" (link--or just do a search for "Seattle woman shot by cops after calling for help").

When this is pointed out, most of those same people find explanations--well, she probably 'looked shady' or some similar bullshit.

I wonder who they will explain away cops shooting a white woman, through her car door, after she called to report a possible assault near her home. (Hey, look, a FOX NEWS link!)

I also wonder how many white people will try to help fellow citizens being attacked, now that they KNOW that they, too, can be shot by poorly trained cops.
Is the rate that they're shot and killed at comparable to how much more likely they are to commit crime?
Rocky Raccoon is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 05:13 PM   #375
Mr. Bill
Mostly Harmless
Squishes the Frog
 
Mr. Bill's Avatar
 

Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: On the border
Posts: 20,988
Re: Politics

What do you suggest, Martial law? Line 'em up in a firing squad if they're likely to commit a crime?

If the perp is armed and dangerous that's one thing, but what I don't understand is using deadly force on unarmed people which has been the case too often.
__________________
Spoiler: For Trolls' Eyes Only


Troll Gate
Please deposit $20.00

*Dimes Only*

Last edited by Mr. Bill; 07-17-17 at 05:39 PM.
Mr. Bill is online now  
Old 07-17-17, 06:59 PM   #376
azteclady
Reads. Crafts. Rabble Rouses. Rants.
Hears the Whispers
 
azteclady's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Looking for trouble and raising hell.
Posts: 14,563
Re: Politics

Preemptive shooting of people of color is the norm already---do a quick search for Tamir Rice, age 12, for one example.

Speaking of which: Today is the third anniversary of the choking homicide (as ruled by the medical examiner, not the media) of Eric Garner. His killer, Daniel Pantaleo, is still employed by the NYPD.

Funny coincidence: Black and brown people killed by cops result in no conviction, and only a handful of indictments. Cop killings? Perpetrators rarely, if ever, are arrested alive: cop justice is a thing.

Another funny coincidence: Black and brown people killed by white supremacists? Perpetrators invariably arrested alive. Black and brown suspected of a crime? At least half the time killed on sight.
__________________
Support MyMedia, shop through our aStore
Also found at my blog and twitter (adult language, adult topics, not always safe for work)

Ignoring annoying blowhards everywhere, for a good long time
azteclady is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 07:04 PM   #377
Mattie
Cons the Conman
 
Mattie's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 28,001
Re: Politics

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Bill View Post
What do you suggest, Martial law? Line 'em up in a firing squad if they're likely to commit a crime?

If the perp is armed and dangerous that's one thing, but what I don't understand is using deadly force on unarmed people which has been the case too often.
Republican Rudolph Giuliani replaced Dinkins as mayor in 1994 and quickly transformed New York into the safest big city in America. He did this chiefly by increasing the NYPD's manpower from 28,000 officers to 40,000, and adopting a zero-tolerance approach to crime-fighting. Toward that end, Giuliani hired William Bratton as his police chief. Bratton was a proponent of the “broken windows” criminological theory which contends that maintaining urban environments in a well-ordered condition—and clamping down on petty crimes—ultimately helps prevent not only low-level vandalism, but also the commission of more serious offenses. Thus Bratton instructed police to more strictly enforce existing laws against such relatively minor infractions as subway-fare evasion, public drinking, public urination, and shakedown operations by “squeegee men” demanding payment in exchange for their unsolicited wiping of the windshields on cars stopped at red lights.

Another vital component of Giuliani's crime-fighting approach was the use of COMPSTAT, an organizational management tool that employs Geographic Information Systems to map crime and identify specific problem areas. In weekly meetings, NYPD executives met with local precinct commanders to discuss the problems revealed by COMPSTAT and devise strategies to deal with them.

The results of Giuliani's efforts were extraordinary, as evidenced by the fact that during his eight years in office, the incidence of homicide in the city fell dramatically, from 1,946 in Dinkins' final year as mayor, to 1,561 in 1994, to 1,177 in 1995, to 983 in 1996, to 770 in 1997, to 633 in 1998, to 671 in 1999, to 673 in 2000, to 649 in 2001.

When Republican Michael Bloomberg succeeded Giuliani as mayor in 2002, he continued the same anti-crime strategies as his predecessor. As a result, homicide rates in the city fell even lower, with totals of 587 in 2002; 597 in 2003; 570 in 2004; 539 in 2005; 596 in 2006; 496 in 2007; 523 in 2008; 471 in 2009; 536 in 2010; 515 in 2011; 419 in 2012; and 335 in 2013.
__________________

"madness, and then illumination"
orson scott card
http://instagram.com/towhateverend
Mattie is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 08:49 PM   #378
Mattie
Cons the Conman
 
Mattie's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 28,001
Re: Politics

How hospitals got richer off Obamacare
http://www.politico.com/interactives...ospital-taxes/

After fending off challenges to their tax-exempt status, the biggest hospitals boosted revenue while cutting charity care.

At the time, Congress was considering not only whether to remove tax-exempt status for teaching hospitals, a cause of Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), but also whether to add requirements forcing hospitals to do more for the low-income, urban communities in which so many of the top hospitals are located. And local leaders in many states were attempting to claw back billions of dollars in forgone tax revenue — a battle that would soon break out between UPMC and the mayor of Pittsburgh, too.

But the hospitals, aided by their good-neighbor initiative, prevailed. The ACA did nothing more to force the hospitals to share their revenue with their neighbors or taxpayers generally.

The result, POLITICO’s investigation shows, is that the nation’s top seven hospitals as ranked by U.S. News & World Report collected more than $33.9 billion in total operating revenue in 2015, the last year for which data was available, up from $29.4 billion in 2013, before the ACA took full effect, according to their own financial statements and state reports. But their spending on direct charity care — the free treatment for low-income patients — dwindled from $414 million in 2013 to $272 million in 2015.

To put that another way: The top seven hospitals’ combined revenue went up by $4.5 billion per year after the ACA’s coverage expansions kicked in, a 15 percent jump in two years. Meanwhile, their charity care — already less than 2 percent of revenue — fell by almost $150 million per year, a 35 percent plunge over the same period.

While operating revenue increased under Obamacare for not-for-profit hospitals like the Cleveland Clinic and UCLA Medical Center, the amount of charity health care they provided fell. For example, while UCLA saw operating revenue grow by more than $300 million between 2013 and 2015, charity care fell from almost $20 million to about $5 million.

Hospitals justify the billions of dollars they receive in federal and state tax breaks through a nearly 50-year-old federal regulation that simply asks them to prove they’re serving the community. (Some states have taken a stricter approach for their tax breaks.) And while hospitals acknowledge that their charity care spending has fallen — pointing to the fact that a record number of Americans are now insured under the ACA — some leaders say the trend could reverse itself if the ACA is repealed.

Hospitals also defend their tax-exempt status by pointing to their total community benefit spending, a roll-up number that can include free screenings and local investments but also less direct contributions, like staff education or hospitals’ internal metrics for when they say there is a gap between what they charge for services and what Medicare or Medicaid pays them.

But in many cases, top hospitals’ community benefit spending has remained flat or declined since the ACA took effect, too.
For example, Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, which has been ranked as the best hospital in the world, spent $53.8 million on community benefits in 2015, down from $62.1 million in 2013, even as its total annual revenue went up by more than $200 million.

Advocates say that not-for-profit hospitals are failing in their responsibilities to their communities, which are beset by rising rates of opioid addiction, diabetes, asthma and other serious but treatable conditions.

“Are they doing enough? I can give you a one-word answer: No,” said Charles Idelson of National Nurses United, a labor union that’s fought with hospitals over their community contributions. “So many of these hospital chains, their clear priority is their budgetary goals or their profit margin.”

Obamacare may have been a mixed blessing for those seeking coverage through the state exchanges, some of which have seen double-digit annual premium hikes, but it’s been a clear boon for the nation’s hospitals.

Multiple studies have linked the ACA’s coverage expansion to improved financial performance, with one analysis finding that hospitals’ profit margins went up by 25 percent in states that expanded Medicaid in 2014. Overall, the industry boasted an 8.3 percent profit margin that year, according to the most recent figures published by the American Hospital Association. That’s the highest performance on record — more than triple the industry’s 2.6 percent profit margin in 2008, amid the recession and before the Obama administration began pushing its health care reforms — and it’s only invited scrutiny from advocates and researchers who say that it’s a sign the system is broken.

Other categories, like financial assistance and outreach programs, have a more direct impact on the local community but made up a minority of the Cleveland Clinic's community benefit.

In 2015, as Obamacare’s coverage expansion took full effect, these more locally beneficial categories shrunk further as the hospital wrote off additional Medicaid-related costs and spent more on educating their own staff.
Financial assistance dropped more than any other category, falling from $169 million to $69 million, as the uninsured rate plunged.

It’s set up a bizarre contrast. Many U.S. cities boast hospitals that are among the best in the world, but the communities around those hospitals might as well be the Third World.

Walk five minutes off the Hopkins campus in downtown Baltimore and you’ll arrive at the city’s Madison-East End neighborhood, where the poverty is both visible — cracked sidewalks, empty storefronts and more than three times as many vacant lots per house than in the rest of the city — but also silently killing residents. The death rate in the neighborhood is 30 percent greater than the rest of the city and mortality from cancer, stroke and heart disease is more than twice as high.

One striking figure: The life expectancy rate in Madison-East End is less than 69 years. That’s lower than the life expectancy in impoverished countries like Bangladesh, Turkmenistan and North Korea. It’s also subtly at odds with the message Hopkins sells to the rich patients it courts from around the world, encouraging them to come to a hospital that’s akin to a health mecca, even if it’s actually located in a rundown area.

“Poor communities around hospitals tend to lack simple conveniences, like grocery stores stocked with healthy, inexpensive food or even places to play or exercise outside safely,” says Elizabeth Bradley, president of Vassar College and co-author of “The American Health Care Paradox,” which offers reams of research on how living in such neighborhoods leads to worse health and social instability. “The paradox is that we focus on and invest in areas like hospital care when social determinants matter so much more,” she says.
__________________

"madness, and then illumination"
orson scott card
http://instagram.com/towhateverend

Last edited by Mattie; 07-17-17 at 08:51 PM.
Mattie is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 09:19 PM   #379
Mattie
Cons the Conman
 
Mattie's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 28,001
Re: Politics

GREAT READ ALERT!!
GREAT READ ALERT!!
GREAT READ ALERT!!


Actual, insightful, thoughtful journalism. You are committing a great disservice to yourself if you skip this one. I've copied and pasted various parts - it's a lengthy article. Sharing because it's from Colorado, and I've been to, and lived close by these areas.

How Trump Is Transforming Rural America
http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...-rural-america

The Women for Trump rally was a local turning point. More than a hundred people showed up, and it galvanized a group of activists. Like other grassroots supporters across the country, they named themselves after Hillary Clinton’s comment that half of Trump’s adherents were racists, sexists, and others who belonged in a “basket of deplorables.” The Deplorables’ approach to the election was fiercely unapologetic. Karen Kulp told me that Trump wasn’t racist; he was simply calling for immigrants to be held accountable to the law. She said she would never support a hateful candidate, because her childhood contact with extremist groups had made her sensitive to such issues.

For Kulp, who is in her mid-sixties and describes her income as limited, the campaign was empowering. Like many in Grand Junction, she believed that Trump would kick-start the local energy industry by reducing regulations. She told me that she had never shaken the sense that the country is under threat. “I think America is lost to us,” she said. “Because of the way I was raised, that is baggage that I will have for the rest of my life.” The Deplorables funded their own activities, and they pooled money in order to buy Trump shirts, hats, and buttons from Amazon, because the official campaign provided almost nothing. “I made about a dozen Amazon orders,” Kulp said, at the DeploraBall. “Every shirt you see here tonight, I bought.”

At the Avalon, the crowd fell silent while a woman prayed: “Thank you for giving us a President who will, with your help, restore this nation to her former glory, the way you created her.” Less than two weeks later, the Deplorables effectively took over the county Republican leadership, with members winning three positions, including the chair. Others looked farther afield. “If Trump won Wisconsin, he could have won Colorado,” Patterson told me. “The issues were here—immigration and energy.” He believed that without the infighting of the last campaign they could do better. In 2018, there will be an election to replace John Hickenlooper, the Democratic Colorado governor, who will vacate his seat because of term limits. At the DeploraBall, Patterson told me that the Republicans can win the governorship and then, two years later, deliver Colorado to Trump. He said, “We’re going to start on the Western Slope and do a sweep east and color it red.”

Like many parts of America that strongly supported Trump, Grand Junction is a rural place with problems that have traditionally been associated with urban areas.

In the past three years, felony filings have increased by nearly sixty-five per cent, and there are more than twice as many open homicide cases as there were a decade ago. There’s an epidemic of drug addiction and also of suicide: residents of Mesa County kill themselves at a rate that’s nearly two and a half times that of the nation.

Some of this is tied to economic problems, but there’s also an issue of perception. The decrease in gas drilling weighs heavily on the minds of locals, although few people seem to realize that the energy industry now represents less than three per cent of local employment. They’ve been slow to embrace other sectors, such as health care and education, which seem to have more potential for future growth.

During the campaign, Trump’s descriptions of inner-city crime and hopelessness often seemed cartoonish to urban residents, but not to rural voters—in Mesa County, Trump won nearly sixty-five per cent of the vote. Pueblo, another large rural Colorado county, has a steel industry that’s been on the wane since the nineteen-eighties. Its county seat now has the state’s highest homicide rate, and last election the county switched from blue to red.

In 1997, Patterson was riding in a car that was hit by a drunk driver, and the bones of his left arm were shattered into several dozen pieces. After six surgeries, he suffered permanent nerve damage, decreased arm mobility, and no future as a closeup magician. Having acquired his G.E.D., he enrolled in classes at the University of Miami. The quality of Patterson’s writing impressed an instructor, who persuaded him to apply to Columbia. The year that Patterson turned thirty, he became an Ivy League freshman. He majored in classics. Every night, he translated four hundred lines of ancient Greek and Latin. In class, he often argued with professors and students.

“The default view seemed to be that Western civilization is inherently bad,” he told me. In one history seminar, when students discussed the evils of the Western slave trade, Patterson pointed out that many cultures had practiced slavery, but that nobody decided to eradicate it until individuals in the West took up the cause. The class booed him. In Patterson’s opinion, most people at Columbia believed that only liberal views were legitimate, whereas his experiences in Grand Junction, and his textbook lessons from magic, indicated otherwise. (“States of mind are no different than feats of manual dexterity. Both can be learned through patience and diligence.”)

“Look, I’m a high-school dropout who went to an Ivy League school,” Patterson said. “I’ve seen both sides. The people at Columbia are not smarter.” He continued, “I went to Columbia at the height of the Iraq War. There were really legitimate arguments against going into Iraq. But I found that the really good arguments against going were made by William F. Buckley, Bob Novak, and Pat Buchanan. What I saw on the left was all slogans and group thought and clichés.”

In July, 2016, Patterson bet a friend two hundred dollars that Trump would win the Presidency. His conservative Washington friends didn’t take Trump seriously, but Patterson believed that the candidate’s ability to connect with voters was uncanny. (“Remember that you will be performing for people of varying degrees of education, in varying degrees of sobriety, and your routines must be easily understood by all of them.”)

Last October, three weeks before the election, Donald Trump visited Grand Junction for a rally in an airport hangar. Along with other members of the press, I was escorted into a pen near the back, where a metal fence separated us from the crowd. At that time, some prominent polls showed Clinton leading by more than ten percentage points, and Trump often claimed that the election might be rigged. During the rally he said, “There’s a voter fraud also with the media, because they so poison the minds of the people by writing false stories.” He pointed in our direction, describing us as “criminals,” among other things: “They’re lying, they’re cheating, they’re stealing! They’re doing everything, these people right back here!”

Before Trump took office, people I met in Grand Junction emphasized pragmatic reasons for supporting him. The economy was in trouble, and Trump was a businessman who knew how to make rational, profit-oriented decisions. Supporters almost always complained about some aspect of his character, but they also believed that these flaws were likely to help him succeed in Washington. “I’m not voting for him to be my pastor,” Kathy Rehberg, a local real-estate agent, said. “I’m voting for him to be President. If I have rats in my basement, I’m going to try to find the best rat killer out there. I don’t care if he’s ugly or if he’s sociable. All I care about is if he kills rats.”

After the turbulent first two months of the Administration, I met again with Kathy Rehberg and her husband, Ron. They were satisfied with Trump’s performance, and their complaints about his behavior were mild. “I think some of it is funny, how he doesn’t let people push him around,” Ron Rehberg said. Over time, such remarks became more common. “I hate to say it, but I wake up in the morning looking forward to what else is coming,”

“We used to just take it on the chin if somebody said something about us,” he said. “The fake-news thing became the popular thing to say, because of Trump.” He believed that Trump has performed a service by popularizing the term. “I’ve seen journalists like yourself doing a better job,” Scott told me. He’s considering a run for governor, in part because of Trump’s example. “People are looking for something different,” he said. “They’re looking for somebody who means what they say.”

In the past eight months, I have never heard anybody express regret for voting for Donald Trump. If anything, investigations into the Trump campaign’s connections with Russia have made supporters only more faithful. “I’m loving it—I hope they keep going down the Russia rabbit hole,” Matt Patterson told me, in June. He believes that Democrats are banking on an impeachment instead of doing the hard work of trying to connect with voters. “They didn’t even get rid of their leadership after the election,” he said.

We were at a coffee shop, and Patterson wore his goth look: silver jewelry, painted nails. “I’ve never been this emotionally invested in a political leader in my life,” he said. “The more they hate him, the more I want him to succeed. Because what they hate about him is what they hate about me.”
__________________

"madness, and then illumination"
orson scott card
http://instagram.com/towhateverend

Last edited by Mattie; 07-17-17 at 09:21 PM.
Mattie is offline  
Old 07-17-17, 09:44 PM   #380
Rocky Raccoon
In Between 'Verses
Hears the Whispers
 
Rocky Raccoon's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: In between verses
Posts: 13,153
Re: Politics

Heh, that article is gold. And also sure to rustle some jimmies 'round here.

So sick of being told I'm inherently racist because I'm white (I don't look Native American enough for anyone to realise that I am as well), when in reality, most black slaves were sold by other black tribes, Irish people were also brought to America as slaves, a huge proportion of slave owners in America were actually Jews (who don't self-identify as white people), and Arabs did and STILL DO sell black people as slaves.

It's almost as if someone is pushing an agenda. Oy vey!

Last edited by Rocky Raccoon; 07-17-17 at 09:47 PM.
Rocky Raccoon is offline  
Closed Thread
« MyMedia-Forum.com > Community > Lostaways! :) »


Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


» Latest Posts: All Discussion Forums
Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Forum
What's New/The Postman Always Emails... ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
catnap
Today 08:16 PM
by Warthawg1
8,185 Lostaways! :)
best sausage available online ( 1 2 3)
Zaphod of Whiskers
Today 07:53 PM
by Zaphod of Whiskers
27 Community Focus
Jake "Raging Bull" LaMotta has...
azteclady
Today 06:52 PM
by Mr. Bill
4 Sports News
Salvation - CBS - Wednesday ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
nsguy
Today 06:47 PM
by nsguy
41 Featured TV General
Midnight, Texas NBC Monday ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
Mr. Bill
Today 06:38 PM
by Hodgepodge
68 Featured TV General
The Orville - Fox Sunday ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
nsguy
Today 06:06 PM
by Hodgepodge
36 Featured TV General
Gotham - FOX Monday ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
azteclady
Today 06:04 PM
by Hodgepodge
526 Featured TV General
The Deuce - HBO Sunday ( 1 2)
Hodgepodge
Today 05:45 AM
by vincentstuntdbl#23
10 Featured TV General
Tin Star
vincentstuntdbl#23
Today 05:43 AM
by vincentstuntdbl#23
2 Featured TV General
Warty's Sandman FR - Endless Nights ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
Warthawg1
Today 01:22 AM
by Warthawg1
834 Literature General Discussion
American Horror Story: Cult - FX Tuesday ( 1 2)
Hodgepodge
Today 12:48 AM
by The Ricksters
19 Featured TV General
The Sinner - USA Wednesday ( 1 2 3... Last Page)
sandi
Today 12:38 AM
by The Ricksters
34 Featured TV General
» Online Users: 299
7 members and 292 guests
Hodgepodge, Mr. Bill, NeillT006, Ness, Tawaret, vonnegut, Zaphod of Whiskers
Most users ever online was 26,316, 05-12-14 at 10:02 AM.
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.0

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:54 PM.

Graphic Design by Crazy Creative
Powered by vBulletin
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.